Houston Mayor Parker Queers Free Speech

Patriot Post – Digest For Thursday
Houston Gay Mafia Goes After Pastors

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In a move eerily similar to that of fascist regimes, the city of Houston demanded that pastors hand over their sermons to the city for a review of teachings that might speak out against homosexuality or transgenderism. After an outcry, the city is partially backing off, but make no mistake: This is a shot across the bow for any who oppose the homosexual agenda.

Last year, Houston voters elected the city’s first openly lesbian mayor, Annise Parker. It wasn’t long before the city passed the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (HERO), which granted “equal rights” (read: preferred status as those with whom no one may disagree) to individuals with gender disorientation pathology. Under the ordinance, men can use ladies’ restrooms, ladies can use men’s restrooms, and, in short, anything goes — except orthodox Christianity. Texans don’t take too well to folks messing with their manhood, and it wasn’t long before a petition drive opposing the ordinance drew more than 50,000 signatures — more than double the number needed to get the issue on the ballot.

Imagine the shock when the mayor and city attorney announced the petition was invalid due to “irregularities.” Specifically, City Attorney David Feldman announced, “With respect to the referendum petition filed to repeal the ‘HERO’ ordinance, there are simply too many documents with irregularities and problems to overlook. The petition is simply invalid. There is no other conclusion.” Actually, there is another conclusion — at least 50,000 Houston residents oppose HERO. Imagine that. But in a suspension of disbelief, the city expects folks to believe that, of 50,000 signatures, more than 32,000 were invalid. Sure, and we have oceanfront property in Dallas to sell them.

In response, opponents of the ordinance filed a lawsuit against the city. Houston now has a coalition of about 400 area churches that oppose the new ordinance, as they actually believe that X and Y chromosomes were designed for a reason. (It’s called science, which the Left supposedly champions.) The churches were not party to the lawsuit, but it just so happens that some of the 50,000 signatures were reportedly gathered at churches (which, incidentally, is fully legal).

In retribution, the city claimed the churches’ sermons were fair game as a political target because petition signatures were gathered inside a church. Several pastors were delivered a subpoena demanding they yield “all speeches, presentations, or sermons related to HERO, the Petition, Mayor Annise Parker, homosexuality, or gender identity prepared by, delivered by, revised by, or approved by you or in your possession” as well as “all communications with members of your congregations” about HERO and the petition drive.

Seems that the tolerant crowd Mayor Parker runs with isn’t so tolerant after all. Unable to abide the idea that Christian pastors may actually be preaching what the Bible says, she tried to intimidate them. Alliance Defending Freedom, which is representing the pastors, noted, “The city council and its attorneys are engaging in an inquisition designed to stifle any critique of its actions.”

Now, the city appears to be backing off — somewhat. “Mayor Parker agrees with those who are concerned about the city legal department’s subpoenas for pastor’s sermons,” according to Janice Evans, chief policy officer for the City of Houston. “The city will move to narrow the scope [of the subpoenas] during an upcoming court hearing.” As if that will smooth things over.

Mayor Parker said, “There’s no question the wording was overly broad. But I also think there was some misinterpretation on the other side.” In other words, they’re still going after HERO opponents — after they adjust the wording a bit.

And then she had the temerity to complain about being “vilified coast to coast.”

Pastor Dave Welch, one of the subpoenaed pastors, said, “What they did by issuing these subpoenas was to punish any pastor in the city of Houston who participated in gathering signatures against the HERO ordinance.” He added that even the revised subpoenas are clearly “an effort to both punish and intimidate those who dared to step-up and oppose this city council.”

It’s no secret that across the nation, efforts are multiplying to silence Christians, censor pastors and eliminate discourse in opposition to the homosexual agenda. The Houston Council’s actions are not the first attempt but are among the most brazen. The Council, however, has no idea what — or whom — it’s up against. Religious Liberty is the bedrock of our Republic, and government review of sermons has no place in the Land of the Free. Parker and her cohorts may think they messed only with a few Texas pastors, but when it comes to defending our God-given and constitutionally protected rights, she messed with all of us.

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My Opinion: You know, instead of demanding Pastors hand over their sermons, etc. maybe they ought to attend Church and hear them in person. Not that it would do any good in either case. Churches are not allowed to promote particular Candidates for any public office. They are allowed to comment on Social Issues, which just happens to include the LGBT “community,” other Religions, and the “goodness” of the cake your mama baked for the last Church Rummage Sale.

I think the City Attorney ought to be forced to publish the petitions with detailed information on why they are “irregular.” Probably the only reason they are considered “irregular” is because they don’t agree with the intolerant Mayor Parker and the City Counsel. Time for another mysterious hard drive crash in Houston…

And I just love the term “gender disorientation pathology.” Nice to have the psychological community backing your weirdness with an official term. I’ll bet y’all qualify for disability under the new American Regime.

queer kwir noun informal offensive plural noun: queers

  1. a homosexual man.

verb informal

3rd person present: queers

  1. 1. spoil or ruin (an agreement, event, or situation).

    “Reg didn’t want someone meddling and queering the deal at the last minute”

Origin

early 16th century: considered to be from German quer ‘oblique, perverse,’ but the origin is doubtful.

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